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#IAMALIONESS: Social Entrepreneur Steps Out For Climate Change

Bird + Stone recenly launched a bracelet to help support the climate movement. Each bracelet gives $5 to the climate-fighting organization of your choice. The company chose to use a graph of the average temperature of earth since 1880 - as a symbol that if we do not act soon, it will be too late.

Bird + Stone recenly launched a bracelet to help support the climate movement. Each bracelet gives $5 to the climate-fighting organization of your choice.

The company chose to use a graph of the average temperature of earth since 1880 – as a symbol that if we do not act soon, it will be too late. The company got off the ground after 24-year-old Elana Reinholtz At age 24, founder, Elana Reinholtz was working in corporate america, feeling less than impactful. After being matched with a microfinance collaborative in rural Kenya, on a eight-hour bus ride from Nairobi, she unexpectedly began teaching business skills to a group of widowed women who were aspiring entrepreneurs. Over the next three weeks, she went door to door on a moped to every business that had been given capital and checked up on the progress; learning what these women could do now that they had more income.

This trip was the turning point and the accidental beginning of Bird + Stone. Reinholtz realized the many opportunities she had growing up in the United States. Due to infrastructure, job opportunities and education, she could follow her dreams. But, rural female farmers in Kenya and especially single mothers; are disadvantaged by a lack of access to capital, to rights of owning their land, and the fact that they have one income to send their children to school and invest in their futures.

In order to fundraise for her trip, Reinholtz made bracelets and sold them to her friends and family. Upon returning, it made sense to use jewelry as the funding vehicle for issues that fight for the equality of women and girls. Bird + Stone was started as a way for everyone to be micro-philanthropists through the simple act of purchasing jewelry.